About your Search

20140226
20140306
STATION
CSPAN2 9
CSPAN 8
CNBC 5
CNNW 2
FBC 2
KQED (PBS) 2
LINKTV 2
MSNBCW 2
KCSM (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 45
Korean 1
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)
. according to the law, the police has the right to self-defense, especially when there have been massive acts of attacks to the police. regressive lead. remember 2004 we had a similar situation. 40,000 people came to the railroad station. they could have been a clash of bloodshed. i went to the railroad station. i stopped be people. i prevented bloodshed. i talked to those who brought them. i said they will never forgive if blood is spilled. >> please take your seat. i insist. >> hello? i have a question. if this is under way, are you ready? what happens? what if this happens? what would you do? do they recognize you? here is my point of view. there is an independent investigation. or someone from the authority. after this independent investigation, maybe we can talk about the courts. not to comment on these questions. i'm very often provoked. how i'm going to put it. i am convinced that the time will come and the truth will travail. everyone will know the truth and this was a show of history on next. i was more interested. there's no person more interested in avoiding blood children -- blood
defense ministry. secretary of state john kerry, he is scheduled to go to kiev tomorrow after russian troops entered crimea over the weekend. the associated press says russia issued ultimatum for surrender of two ukraine yap warships in crimea. secretary kerry said the international community could kick russia out of the g8 holding meetings in sochi in june and they could freeze assets if russia does not withdraw the occupation. he is scheduled to make remarks shortly from the state department after a meeting with the prime minister of moldova. we'll bring you remarks on companion network c-span. russian president vladmir putin said he sent troops to protect russian personnel in military bases in southern ukraine after the ouster of ukraine's president. secretary of state kerry will speak to the american israel public affairs committee meeting, aipac. we will have the secretary's remarks live from the conference on our companion network c-span. those remarks are scheduled to start at 5:00 eastern time. at the pentagon -- >> internet as we know it today, bears no resemblance to monopol
. comcast nbcuniversal. >>> the defense department proposed slashing its army for the first time in 75 years setting up what promises to be a fierce fight on capitol hill. law makers on both sides of the aisle vowing to fight the proposed cuts to the pentagon budget. bret stevens joins us with more. they are taking the army down from what to what? >> 520,000 now, under 450,000 at some point in this term, which would leave us with an army as small as it's been since 1940 before the eve of the second world war. >> on the other hand, he's increasing special forces from 66,000 to 70,000 and taking down the marines slightly from 190 to 182,000. status quo mostly there. what do you make of this? is it as risky as some of the critics say? >> i think it is. for instance, with an army of 450,000 men, if we had that in 2007, we never could have contemplated a surge. >> surge in iraq. >> the surge in iraq which allowed us to win the war, at least in iraq. the army -- let's not forget the army was too small back at the end of the first bush administration. that's why we had to fight the iraq/iran wars s
demand. >> more likely the defense minister. >> i thought in the closing ceremonies there was even the flash of russian with that i love, see them making fun of themselves with the system ring not opening. that was a kind of showbiz moment of irony that was nice. told the story. there was a narrative in the opening ceremony. part of my job, sitting in between matt lauer and meredith vieira. some people thought i was debbie downer. here comes the march persians of 1937. there was an attempt, however macy'sque du soleil, day thanksgiving parade in terms to show the best face forward even historically. centuries afor legacy of rivers, blood, oppression, but part of his of theatism and building state is to reassert a different history, a glorious history. wonderful future. >> and to toboggan right past the unpleasantness because he feels we have heard that in the west has been dancing in the end zone about its victory in the cold war and the turmoil of russian history. >> it was the latest geostrategic tragedy of the century. >> what are we experiencing in the ukraine? >> this is anoth
minister david cameron answered questions wednesday on funding for flood defense, unemployment and cuts to the u.k.'s defense programs. from london, this is just over 30 minutes. >> questions for the prime minister. >> question number one, mr. speaker. >> thank you, mr. speaker. >> this morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and according to my duties, i shall have further such meetings later today. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i think we should also congratulate on his tremendous win in that winter olympics. it was announced a bonuses of 2.3 billion pounds. 140% pay rise for the chief executive. when ordinary families face a cost-of-living crisis. isn't it time for this government to listen to labor to get our young people back to work? >> i congratulate the olympic team for the best metal performance since 1924 at a winter's game. it was a huge honor to welcome them. we had an explanation of the task of the skeleton bobsledding and indeed curling. congratulation goes to everyone involved and all those who helped to train them. on the issue of bank bonuses -- they are well do
. between the department of defense and the va and i know we're in the process of tearing that down. we're one family. when you take that oath and say i'm going to serve this country, it should go right on through. there shouldn't be this wall and this divide between the opportunities that exist to take care of our troops. electronic medical records that he spoke about, to me that is a shame and delays care, makes it more difficult to have a smooth flow of care. i do see positive things. i was at base luis mccord last year and seen start upprograms where they are focusing on transition at the time of ets. and it makes sense to me if you are disabled, getting a medical separation that your level of disability can be determined at that time and carry over into the va. instead of having to go through these processes and having redone the services. there's other things i see starting to take place and that's guiding as they are leaving the military into being able to use the skills they learned in the military and translate them into civilian work and helping them get there and guidance on
this afternoon is dr. james jay carafano, vice president of foreign and defense policy studies. he is our richardson fell and also directs the kathryn and shelby david institute for international study. he also serves as a senior fellow at the george washington university homeland security policy institute, serves on the board of trustees for the marine corps university foundation, on the advisory board for the west point center of or history, the hambleton society and operation renewed hope foundation. is an agenda professor at georgetown university and the institute of world politics and to serve as a visiting professor at the national defense university as well as georgetown university. he has written several books, the most recent being his co-authoring of a textbook on homeland security and, of course, he co-authored for heritage, our book on winning the long war, lessons from the cold war for defending terrorism and preserving freedom. lease join me in welcoming jim carafano. [applause] >> thank you. i'm going to be extremely brief so we can get right to the top of. i want to start
investors, and help restructure the economy. the defense budget has seen double digit growth almost every year since 1989, and that will continue. this year's defense spending will increase by more than 12% to about $130 billion. li said the government will do more to address concerns about pollution, and the wealth gap. >> translator: air, water and soil pollution is severe in some places. and the task of conserving energy and reducing emissions remains arduous. >> reporter: and he promised the government will severely punish public servants and others involved in corruption. after the session we asked some delegates about li's report. >> translator: i think the campaign against corruption should be more tightened up. it's also set out in report. only in doing so the government could do its own duty. >> this i think is a basement, there will be some problem. so we need to do things step by step. >> let's now talk more about the government work report. nhk world kyoko fujita spent the day going through it. let's start by talking about the 7.5% economic growth target. what's behind the dec
was really interesting, after those charges were read out, the defense attorney erupting oscar pistorius laid out, if you will, some of the points of the defense. oscar pistorius signed an affidavit at his bail hearing said that he had heard a disturbance in the bathroom of his house just after he had been to retrieve some fans from the balcony of that apartment of that house, and that's when he grabbed the pistol from underneath his bed, went into the bathroom, shot those shots through the bathroom door. even the magistrate at the time at the bail hearing had said, how could oscar pistorius not have known that his girlfriend, reeva steenkamp, wasn't in the bed? well, listening to his defense attorney now, we're beginning to get some semblance of details added on. his defense attorney said as oscar, or just before oscar pistorius went to get those fans from his balcony, he had talked to reeva steenkamp in bed. the indication there laying the groundwork that he believed she was in bed because he had just talked to her. he said it was pitch dark and that's why he didn't know. so, we're beginnin
served since 2002, also focusing on afghanistan. 2013, he has served as the secretary of defense for afghanistan, pakistan and central asia with the assistant secretary of self-defense. prior to this he was deputy assistant secretary of defense for east asia, and then he also served as the dcm at the u.s. embassy in beijing. and last, but not least, it is a pleasure to welcome back an old friend and former u.s. ip colleague. from june 2010 to june 2013, alex thier served for afghanistan and pakistan affairs. before joining u.s. aa, he served here at u.s. ip is a senior advisor and director for afghanistan and pakistan from -- for 2005 and 2010. from 2002 to 2004, he served as an advisor in kabul and also in the 1990's worked in afghanistan for the you and -- . r the un with that i will turn it over to you, mr. grossman. then we will have some time for question and answers. >> thank you very much. let me say thanks to all the organizers of this event and what an honor it is to be on this panel. having served as a special representative, i know what this is about. if you will allow
were in high, high -- >> more likely, they had the defense ministry. >> and the army, too. and i thought in the closing ceremonies, there was even a flash of the kind of russian wit that i love. to see them making fun of themselves with the fifth ring not opening. >> rose: oh, yeah. >> i thought that was a kind of show biz moment of irony that was nice. but them the real world reasserts itself. >> rose: and they told a story. there was a narrative in the opening ceremony. >> they did. and i think that was part of my job sitting in between matt lauer and meredith viera to-- i guess, you know, some people thought i was debbie downer-- "here comes the marching persians of 1937." but more seriously, there was an attempt -- >> here comes a guy who has actually lived in russia. >> but there was an attempt, however much a cirque du soleil kind of macy's thanksgiving day parade terms, to show the best face forward, even historically. russian history is-- has been for centuries a legacy of-- in many ways of rivers of blood and oppression and-- but part of putin's cashatism and his buildin
was called the western defense zone. so they were we moved -- removed, they were forced to leave, and they were put in camps surrounded by barbed wire, and they were not charged with anything in particular. west coast non-japanese-americans, the population in general, most poll constitutions, most newspapers strongly supported the removal of japanese-americans. it was a very popular policy locally. the civil rights organizations which were largely based back east didn't pay much attention to it. in all of the major jewish newspapers on the west coast, they were weeklies, and they had editorials talking about how the rights of all are to be protected, and we should fight prejudice in all of it forms and so on and so forth without ever saying the word "japanese" specifically, so it was almost as if they wanted to say something but were nervous about actually doing so. so there was, i call it a kind of awkward silence or an uncomfortable silence around this issue that i started to investigate more. >> this weekend booktv and american history tv look behind the history and literary l
views as a criminal defense lawyer. a comprehensive revision of the federal criminal code should focus on five main points. reducing the number of federal crimes, ensuring that the revised code strikes a proper balance between federal and state law enforcement, clearly defining the appropriate levels of mens rea, establishing uniform rules of construction, and revising the overly harsh punishment system. i'll take those in turn. fir, reducing the number of federal offenses. the list of federal crimes has grown from handful in the crimes act of 1790, to thousands today. this has occurred in part because the country has become more complex and also occurs because everytime there's a national crisis the reaction is to enact new federal crimes. the result is a morass of overlapping statutes. the more than two dozen different -- chapter 47. seven different fraud statutes in chapter 63 and i count 19 different obstruction offenses in chapter 73 of title 18. this proliferation of federal offenses has too main practical consequences from my perspective. first of all the sheer number of crimes
for their strong support for israel. [applause] for our security, including in the vital area of missile defense. i said that the greatest threat to our common security is that of a nuclear-armed iran. we must prevent iran from having the capability to produce nuclear weapons. and i want to reiterate that point, not just, to prevent them from having the weapon, but to prevent them from having the capacity to make the weapon. [applause] that means we must dismantle iran's heavy water reactor and its underground enrichment facilities. we must get rid of iran's centrifuges and its stockpiles of enriched-uranium and we must that iran fully divulge the military dimensions of its nuclear program. now 17 countries around the world have peaceful nuclear energy programs. they're doing this without spinning centrifuges, without enriching uranium, without operating heavy water facilities, and without conducting military nuclear research. you know why iran insists on doing all of these things that the other peaceful countries don't do? it's because iran doesn't want a peaceful nuclear program. iran wants a mil
a source at ukraine's defense ministry. he said the commander of the black sea fleet issued an ultimatum to surrender. an official from the russian navy denied the report. oleksandr turchinov warned people in crimea not to react to provocations. >>> the united states is hoping diplomacy and the threat of sanctions will help settle the crisis in crimea. u.s. president barack obama has referred to statements by nato and the group of seven industrialized country that strongly condemn russia. he says he'll continue diplomatic efforts but also suggested other options. >> if, in fact, they continue on the current trajectory that they're on, that we are examining a whole series of steps, economic, diplomatic, that will ice late russia. >> u.s. secretary of state john kerry and assistant secretary of state victoria nuland, will both visit the ukrainian capital of kiev on tuesday. the u.s. defense department says it is suspending military exchange programs with russia. such contacts are aimed at reducing the chance of an emergency resulting from a misunderstanding. the announcement came as russia
, the defense chief. >> because of our correct tactics and our people refusal to surrender. ththe blitz by putin has failed. >> another shrine to those gunned down on the alleged orders of former president viktor yanukovych. tim friend, al jazeera, kiev. >> the unfolding events in ukraine and russia are been playing out on tv screens across the globe. but according to many media analysts some of the reports in russia are anti-ukraine propaganda. >> reporter: the world according to the kremlin played out each night on news broadcasts with a familiar loop on the sound track. the leadership of ukraine's interim government is made up of you will from a national fascists, near nazis and radicals from the west near bent on corruption. >> what the public sees is the picture in which fascist gangs seized tower in kiev. they are dangerous. they are jeopardized the livelihood of hours, russian speakers, russian.co. compatriots, you however it is put, and russia is coming to save these people. >> reporter: in my opinion the blood spilt in kiev are on the hands of western politician who is are coming to mee
and hezbollah's efforts to destabilize the region. state and defense department officials testified at the hearing which also covered the refugee crisis caused by the one million syrian refugees who now live in lebanon. this is just under two hours. >> i want to call this meeting of the senate foreign relations committee, the subcommittee on the near east, and central asian affairs to order. i want to welcome all who are here, especially our four expert witnesses who we'll hear testimony from today. the senate is currently in the middle of a vote on a veterans' bill that will take a bit of time, but i want to take advantage of folks being here. we will proceed to a first panel and then a second panel with questions, and this is a very important topic. the topic of the hearing today is lebanon at the crossroads. i just returned from a trip in lebanon last week with senator angus king of maine. we went together because we served together on -- serve together on armed services and budget committees, but i'm on the foreign relations committee, and senator king's on the intelligence comm
wisdom in the defense bar is, don't even think about resisting a government overtour for a plea in a corporate context, and now the government is just going with what are called dps, not even resolving cases criminally because that's too difficult, so the department of justice reaches a civil resolution. >> thank you. justice for the committee, i just think that something that we should think, especially on our side of the aisle -- as conservatives we should be very concerned about the state having so much power that criminal defense phones are afraid to go to trial because they know that actually they take more risk going to trial than defending liberty and property and the things that the government should not easily take away from defendants. thank you very much. i yield back my time. >> i'm told we'll be voting between 10:20 and 10:30. excuse me. gentleman from georgia, mr. johnson. >> thank you. it's not so much the sheer volume of criminal laws on the books and how they are apportioned among the various titles of the u.s. code. it's really a matter of what is the impact ov
of secretary of defense for policy. he helps execute defense policy, strategy for ity 15 middle east nations. we are happy to have him with us. i would like to ask mr. silverman first to offer your testimony. accept your written testimony into the testimony. try to summarize within five then we will get if question and answer after plehn.l >> thank you for inviting me to testify on the situation in policy toward that very important country and volatile region. the hearing comes at an important moment. public discussion of lebanon as say in the united states is often focused primarily on the refugee the syrian flows into that country. that crisis that you witnessed recent d during your visit to lebanon represents an urgent imperative need. lebanon faces broader issues. the united states is helping lebanon respond to the lebanon's because future affects important u.s. nterests in the region which are obvious by the geographical nature of the location and neighborhood. the syrian conflict threatens lebanon to establi establishes lasting stability. formation of a government by the prime ministe
, would you expect russia to come to their defense? >> the russians are coming off a pretty successful olympics. i do not think they want to provoke the type of international incident. but it is very fluid. there would be pressure for russians to come to the defense over the russian speaking population. the black sea fleet is going to be a big issue. >> scarlet, you have some important breaking news. >> we just got results from sears. $3.30 per share. revenues are in line with estimates. sales are down 6.4%. other company news. set to report. the annual report could be released this saturday. lego topping its rivals in asia. rose by theo single digits in the u.s. and europe and double digits elsewhere. don't take jamie dimon lightly. a j.p. morgan spokesman says he was saying that market volume is unpredictable at times like the weather. that is today's company news. we are focused on what happened overnight in crimea. >> we certainly are. >> that leads us to our twitter question. as vladimir putin part of the solution, part of the problem, how does he fit into the puzzle? tweet us. th
patrolling cry meia, those were not russian forces at all. he insisted they were, quote, local defense forces and call the people's uprising against ukrainian president viktor yanukovych an unconstitutional coup and said they were sitting in a laboratory and running experiments on rats and described anti-government protests, the ones that killed scores of people two week ago an orgy of radicals. putin was nervous, angry, cornered and paranoid, written in the new republic. here was an authoritarian dancing uncomfortably in his new dictator shoes. in the last few years it's something like conventional knowledge in moscow journalistic circles that put. was no longer getting new good information, surrounded by yes men who created a parallel informational universe. indeed, living in a parallel universe seem to be one of the only explanations for putin's perilously irrational behavior. joining me, mark halperin, and from washington, the new york times' white house correspondent and former moscow bureau chief, peter baker. peter, what thoughts are running through putin's head and why he's -- i mean
of the national defense council. and i spoke to one of the representatives of that council, deputy summer somer about the intentions of the russians. let's just listen in to what she thought. >> we understand that this is main goal of the russian army to -- ukrainian army to have its own country. but just now, we don't have any cases with -- where our on -- >> do you fear that there's going to be an escalation of the conflict area outside of crimea to, perhaps, eastern ukraine, for instance, which has a lot of russian support, we're told? >> so dangerous of escalation is very high. but ukrainian government try to keep the situation and our message for all ukrainian army to give the people. we understand that we are doing everything without armed forces. >> do you consider russian actions so far to be a declaration of war by russians on ukraine? >> yes. we can see the decision of the russian parliament and we can see act on the ukrainian territory in crimea. >> what they're saying here is the actions on the ground that have been a declaration of war. we've had a mobilization of regular forces, a
democratizing part of the world, compared to home affairs or defense or some of the ore ministries that people are vying for in a new government? >> i certainly hope you would be. and in my own country where i served as prime minister, i started as education minister and i was very delighted to get that portfolio. because i knew if i was going to make a long term difference for my own nation, for the opportunity, for the lives of our young people, for our economy for the long term. for our competitive position in the asia pacific, that there was no better portfolio than education, to make all of that change. and what's true for a country like australia is even more startlingly true in developing nations. if i'm an up and coming politician i would be scratching and fighting for that portfolio. >> that's why i asked you. you said earlier in your career that in fact foreign affairs was interesting but not your passion. you preferred the education ministry. but is that the place where you become an international personality? if we look, you know, there are 50 nations in africa, three dozen in asia
doing massachusetts. the same day that massachusetts came out, this court decided environmental defense versus duke which decided -- even when a defined term is construed a particular way, it doesn't mean the same term can be construed differently where context -- cannot be construed differently where context requires. that is why massachusetts, after indeed holding that the definition of pollutant included greenhouse gases, didn't go there -- stop there. it asked whether applying it to the title ii provisions on motor vehicles would yield extreme measures or counterintuitive results. only then did they direct the epa to apply the definition. they understood that the literal definition of pollutant was sufficiently broad that it should not be applied without some additional analysis of the context of the provisions. >> what else does it cover other than the -- mobile vehicles? >> there are multiple places where it appears in the act. they have interpreted the words, any air pollutant to mean any subset of the pollutants that this definition -- >> that is because the section that it is i
as a government, you need to put it to a good purpose either enhancing productivity or providing defense or essential services. the u.s. has the advantage of being a reserve currency country. we can issue treasuries at low interest rates. that is essentially what supports our fiscal -- >> we could talk all morning about fiscal multipliers. unfortunately, mr. putin is speaking in russia. i believe he is in his residence. he is looking casual this morning. >> you can't beat some of these headlines -- >> he has his shirt on. >> that is an exclusive. clarida takes a shot at putin. >> a tie and jacket for mr. putin. bc is he met with the d'amico meth and he -- he says he with viktor yanukovich and he is alive. he has no sympathy for him. take a look at the features. your cohorts in crime suggest, do we just ignore all of this ukraine chat? >> the reality is, there is no serious prospect of the u.s. or nato escalating this. as tragic as it is for the ukrainian people, it looks as though it is now not going to become a larger geopolitical impact. that is why you see the markets rebounding. >> i
launched the virginia self-defense law firm, focused on defending self to map -- defending self-defense rights. randy is: from tennessee. go ahead. i am calling from kentucky, sir. host: ok. where are you? caller: eastern kentucky. host: go ahead. what do you think about the let's move campaign? caller: ok. i think a lot of the obesity comes from what is put in our food. processed to grow, the meets, the steroids, what people put in their gardening stuff to get it to grow has to affect human body, as well as the defects the animals. -- affects the animals. host: do you avoid processed foods? caller: there is nothing out there to avoid. host: thank you sir. start them young with a healthy diet. today is friday. every week and beginning at 8:00 a.m. on c-span two, book tv and american history tv, respectively. 48 hours of books and 40th hours of history on 2 and 3. this week, we are featuring a visit to salem, oregon. you can watch that this weekend on book tv and on american history tv. next up is sharon in illinois. caller: hello. i am all for the program. let's move. i have something t
.s.-afghanistan relations. including a bilateral security agreement. speakers included former state and defense department officials and thand a representative withe u.s. agency for international development. the event was hosted by the u.s. institute of peace in washington, d.c. it runs about one hour 10 minutes. >> i would also like to thank all of you for coming. thank your distinguished guests, ambassador dobbins in particular. also our panelists for this first panel which is titled the united states and afghanistan, the longview. i think it's only in a town like washington, d.c. we can talk about looking beyond 2014 as a longview. but given the tendency to view, have a quite a reactive u.s.-afghanistan policy in relations certainly of late with lots of focusing deed on security transition in the upcoming political transition in 2014 in particular, i do think in terms of the current discourse in washington talking about life beyond 2014 in afghanistan is taking a longview. i think one of the objectives in this, for today, is really to try to look at the future relation between the u.s. and pakistan be
legitimate concerns of russian speaking people. people's brigade for self-defense has been establish who'd had already to curb attempts for forcible take over administrative building in crimea and bringing weapons and ammunition on to the peninsula. we had information on preparation of new provocative acts through the russian black sea float in ukraine in these situations, the authorities of the republic have asked the presidents of russia to restore calm in crimean it's completely legitimate under russian law, and given the extraordinary situation in ukraine, this threat and the threat to our come -- compatriots, prognosis citizens and the black sea fleet. because of this the president of russia went to the federation asking for the you of armed forces and -- on the first of march, the council of the federation supported this appeal, which we hope will cut off the radicals, and i repeat, we're talking about defending our citizens and ourght, the ri. madam president, today i am also authorized to say the following. the president has received 0 -- of russia has received the following from
gunshots. but she was reduced to tears as the defense counsel launched a rigorous examination of what she did hear. oscar pistorius denies murdering his girlfriend. we have this report from pretoria. >> reporter: it's day two of the oscar pistorius trial in a wet and gray pretoria. oscar pistorius left his uncle's house to hear witness michel burger. ms. burger, who wanted to remain anonymous said she heard screams and shots on valentine's day last year. >> do you know what it sounds like? >> i know what a gunshot sounds like 177 meters away. >> that's what you believe. do you know what it sounds like when you hit a bat hard against a door? >> no, my lady, i never hit a bat against a door. >> there is huge media interest in this story. not just in newspapers but also on television because of that historical judgment that cameras can be allowed for the first time during a trial. people are following this live on radio and television. >> everyone has an opinion about the trial. for some members of the public, racial stereotypes die hard. >> half an hour before the lunchtime adjournment, the
gun indictments from previous incidents. pistorius' defense team said that last year's shooting was an accident. >> the fatal gunshot wounds to reeva, this occurrence was indeed an accident and i mistakenly believed that an intrude are or intruders had entered my home and posed an imminent threat to reeva and me. >> nick, what's the latest? >> reporter: kyra, if you wanted to get a sense of how this is all going to play out over the next few weeks, this afternoon would have told you everything. pistorius' defense lawyer, barry rue ripping into the witness there, michelle burger, questioning her time and again, how many shots, how did you hear them? what did you hear the screaming? what did your husband hear? your husband heard something different? he accused her of, you are adapting, you are speculating, you are closing the gap, all but telling her she is getting wrong, trying to inject an element of doubt in her testimony. she started off as a nervous witness. she started off speaking her native african. she finished the afternoon speaking in english standing up to that severe
. north korea, when that happens, we usually get an uptick along the south korean defense plays. naver corp, two percent down after gains last week. i will be back later on. john, back to you. j.crewican fashion has -- has friends in very hype very high places. and may have a new owner. >> that is the country trading in the japanese trading session. they may acquire j.crew for a deal valued at the $5 billion. really looking to make inroads in the u.s. unwilling to grow and expand overseas. they want to be the world's largest clothing retailer. so they are betting on scoop-neck tees and cardigans. the bigs fan is michelle obama the united states. she loves them. i love -- i wear some j.crew j.crew -- i wear some clothing. it is hard to buy it here. leonard green has been the guy behind gap and trying to promote j.crew's band overseas. similar goals. j.crew is a privately held company. according to people familiar with the matter, they have explored the idea of going the ipo route. but that his not -- that has not this is armed during company that finds itself in a mid-tier. they have ab
to maneuver from the north some korean defense ministry said friday that north korea's lee business launched seems to have been planned to quit so the sorrows school's annual military drills in washington. the ministry said the north have five four projectiles which considering their speed and direction are presumed to have the true range scud missiles. this is the norm for scud missile launch in five years the laws also follows an incursion by a patrol boat over the de facto great time border within the two countries on monday. what's a seoul's defence minister said at that time was sent to test the south korean military. it is. given its timing coming right after the inter korean family re union suddenly ongoing key result rails. we believe that the north's missile launch was very intentional about time for publication the ministry said the south korean military is prepared for any provocations from the north. just hours before the launch so i propose around the red cross talks to resolve major units used include a reunion for families separated by the korean war. sold unification ministry
-range missiles. it was confirmed by the defense ministry as well. these things get ratcheted up. daysly we get one or two defenset of these related stocks listed in south korea. they were up. now we are seeing modest losses. means thatred, and is weakening. we are down about a quarter of one percent for south korea. really in line with what we are seeing across the region. we are talking about japan reopening. another big he'll could be brewing. fast retailer said to be in talks to buy j.crew. they say the valuation could top $5 billion. earnings story. to be disappointed. bringing down the forecast because of a disappointing performance. mazda does a lot of business in europe. the japanese yen strengthening for 30 straight days. that doesn't exactly bode well for profits. jpmorgan with a note of raising the rate on several players. the electric company raised to high perform. term more than anything else. back to you. >> thanks, david. today we are looking at asia's gridlock streets. more than 20 million cars were sold in china alone last year, leading to clogged roads and increased aleutian.
missiles in those two countries, defensive missiles, part of the missile shield, to be used against rogue regimes such as iran. although, they still don't have missiles as far as we know that have kind of range. this is starting to look like a highly destablizing moment in history. >> you are right. thhs is how regional wars get started, one thing is is not openly discussed, is that we're rely on russia for removal of our equipment from afghanistan. as president obama goes into his idea for a transition or withdrawal, if not russia, pakistan. it is jumping from pot to the fire. lou: well, pots and fires, but, this is a president right now who it is clear, was wrong in his assessment of putin, and russia's ambitions, and looks like he has underestimated his administration and our different's ability to government's a bill to respond to such an act by russia, what is or recourse now, in your judgment, as a geo political analyst? >>, we have two main tracks to follow, one is arming the other states that border russia, giving them what they need to defend. second santions track there is no ma
a defense -- >> no, the decision was met with cheers outside the capitol building. she was met with major corporations and -- the thing i don't like about twitter. to me, maybe i didn't know every nuance and detail about it, but just the idea that a lunch counter that someone would say, no, you're not being served here, somebody -- that was enough for me. i didn't realize how many different situations twitter people could come up with to show me that there was some time when this might make sense. it's like, i don't want to know all your splitting hair opinions about why personal freedom, it's like, okay, let's say you're a florist. someone comes in. they want you to do this at this. you don't like the way -- you know, all these different things about, if it's junior business, why can't you decide whether or not this is somewhere where you're going to -- >> you tie it right back to civil rights. the immediate reaction is, we don't serve your kind here. you can't say that. we decided that 50, 60 years ago. you can't do that. >> but i was like reading these -- where these convoluted situati
for the murder of his girlfriend reeva steenkamp. the defense lawyers say he believed that she was a burglar. russia's a central bank raised its key rate to 7.5% from 5.5% as of 11:00 a.m. moscow time. the central bank says the rate increase is to prevent inflation risk and ensure financial stability, this according to its website. u.s. secretary of state john leaders a western responding to russia seizing control of the crimean peninsula. the ukraine said it has mobilized its army. >> it is really 19th-century behavior in the 21st-century first century and there is no way to start with, that if russia persists in this that the g-8 countries will assemble in sochi. that is a start. fromt's get the latest ukraine. where ryan chilcote is on the ground. british foreign secretary has been speaking this morning. bring us up to speed. >> i will give you the very latest. of the russian prime minister has just announced that he -- russia is establishing a company to build a bridge across the --this literally happened the last couple of minutes. pretty -- the straight connects -- effectively it will
to be active participation on both sides of an issue, of a person charged with a crime. on defense or litigation over a law itself. so chairman goodlatte from here in virginia had -- just across the river in virginia had called a hearing in judiciary this week. we had another about the constitutionality or lack thereof of actions by this administration, and it's very alarming, professor johnson totally with whom i disagreed on any policy issues, has a wonderful grasp of the constitution, and he recognizes the dangers when administration decides to pick and choose which laws will be enforced and goes further and issues executive orders not like prior administrations that simply explain on most occasions or illuminate some law as to how they think it's to be interpreted, but to actually make law in executive orders. that's just unconscionable for somebody that took an oath to defend the constitution. . so i can't recall times aye agreed with the "l.a. times" before, but they had an editorial that indicates even the "l.a. times" understands the danger of what's going on right now in t
large scale human rights violations against its ethnic russians in the ukraine, the russian defense ministry confirmed that fighter jets were now on high alert along the border with ukraine that's of course part of the surprise, war games we've been reporting on since yesterday including long range aircraft, warships as well as some 150 troops and some 900 tanks. the main flash point is ukraine's crimea peninsula, strategic for russia, the home of the black sea fleet, scuffles broke out yesterday between proand anti-russian protesters outside crimea's parliament. overnight the building was seized by armed men speaking russian with rpgs, sniper rifles, in effect vigilantes who raised the russian flag over the building. today police surround that building hoping to contain the situation while ukraine's acting president warned russia that any troop movements outside of the black sea fleet base would be seen as an aggression against ukraine, and all of this going on, ross, based on as a result of many things but now we're seeing photos even of ukrainian armored personnel carriers and tr
made during my time, particularly at the department of defense where he met with so many americans who have served enough gas and at the behest of their country some of them believed what they were doing that all of them believed in their country and they all have done a great job of which their nation should be very proud. that's why i would like to speak on the national security forces that but i want to start off a e more broadly earlier people talked about the fact the polling shows two thirds of the american people think that going into afghanistan was a mistake. interestingly enough two thirds of the afghan people think the effort to help them has been a great success. all of the frothing about the bsa and president of karzai and the back and forth are the fundamental successes and a lot of them have been laid out by others that have been speaking and i want to stress however on the military side the building of the afghan army, the police and the intelligence agencies have been a tremendous success. making any progress is a huge challenge even if things are going well even if th
to switch to a different topic which is afghanistan. the native defense ministers are getting ready for a complete withdrawal from afghanistan by the end of the year. there a lot of discussion if we continue on that path, a lot of the progress that has been made in afghanistan is not sustainable. what do you think we are going to see over the course of the next nine months as we head towards the zero option as some people call it in afghanistan? >> i think there is the real danger of a crisis in that relations with afghanistan. but, ultimately, it's their country and they have to think of its future. we have made a commitment with which we have stuck for more than ten years now, trying to create a more modern afghanistan. i feel we were a little ambitious in trying that. it might have been wise just to stick to the military operation and see some sort of negotiated outcome could be reached earlier. but we are where we are. i think the after gpeople from afghanistan are not ready to figure out the long-range relationship with us. we might be better off leaving sooner rather than late
think europe will play defense and the u.s. will be worried about where its economy is going. >> it's interesting that you are saying that as a lot of people are thinking that the united states are steaming ahead, whereas europe is sort of stagnating. >> i would say the way europe has approached it is more long-term sustainable. the u.s. problems are in the future but they're major problems. the european problems are much more observable. if you like, europe has an upside down iceberg with most of its problems on the surface and the u.s. is an iceberg. >> we're just getting some flashes across the wires about egypt, apparently reappointing the petroleum minister and the planning minister and interior minist minister and no mention of a potential future president. we'll keep you abreast of any further developments. >> we're updated every day for events going on as far as egypt is concerned. futures are suggesting we might get a dip down at the beginning. still to come on the show dreamworks failed to give a turbo charge. the animated movie about a racing snail, i did see this one, se
, on trial for the shooting of his girlfriend. defense attorneys cross examined a witness who described hearing a woman scream and then heard gunshots. he said he shot his girlfriend by mistake, thinking that she was a burglar. we want to turn back to our coverage of the ukraine, the white house keeping close tabs on russia, trying to see what it will do with troops in ukraine. there's word sanctions could come soon for russia along with economic aid for ukraine. lisa stark is in washington, what are we hearing from the white house? >> the white house just announced it is working with congress to provide $1 billion, a billion dollars in loan guarantees to ukraine to help cover energy costs. it's part of a package of financial assistance that the u.s. and the international community are working to try to provide to that country to restore economic stability there. john kerry, the secretary of state has arrived in kiev, the capitol of ukraine for his series of meetings. >> president obama called his national security council together to discuss how to deal with the events unfolding in ukr
? are you going to cut in education? are you going to cut in defense? obviously with the minimum wage that doesn't increase the government budget. look, we're willing to look at combinations of things but the president has put his idea on the table. if my colleague paul ryan wants to put another idea on the table, we'll obviously take a look at that going forward. >> this is sort of symbol ig on both sides but to me, i was at least a little gratified, republicans think maybe you could do something with corporate taxation and, you know, something with the taxes that are staying overseas and do some infrastructure stuff, maybe they're open to that. at least there are seeds of what looks to be things that could get done. it's symbolic. i wish the president would be more persuasive about corporate tax reform. let me ask you one philosophical question, chris. >> yes. >> that is while we're trying to decide how to help people that need help, there are two thoughts. one is that we don't want to entrench people into dependency. you look at how many people are on food stamps now, how many peop
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)